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With 30 percent of Kansas nursing homes facing federal citations with steep penalties, the nursing homes responded by saying they suffer from “extreme treatment.”

A good portion of Kansas nursing homes are facing lofty citations and fines. Some 30 percent of Kansas nursing homes are putting their residents in jeopardy or harm’s way, according to citations. That percentage is the fourth highest in the United States.

The state of Wisconsin compiled a report in 2017 showing that 30.3 percent of nursing homes have citations for possible harm or immediate jeopardy. The national average is around 13 percent. The state’s nursing home industry is responding and taking its case to Kansas lawmakers.

Immediate jeopardy is as bad as it sounds: it references a situation at the facility has caused serious injury, illness, impairment, or death. Kansas inspectors have issued 99 citations in 2017 to Kansas nursing homes.

The nursing home industry contends that they are suffering from “extreme treatment” from the government. They want the state agency that runs the inspections — the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services — to alter its inspection process.

Since 2012, nursing homes have faced a 8,877 percent increase in federal fines and citations that also bring about penalties and stipulations to the nursing homes.

LeadingAge Kansas, an organization consisting of over 150 nonprofit aging service providers, reported that the number of immediate jeopardy cases in Kansas rose from nine in 2012 to 134 in 2016. The number rose gradually each year through 2015, when the government issued 60 citations, before jumping in 2016.

LeadingAge also said that the fines devastate the nursing homes financially. “There is no possible justification for a 9,000 percent increase in Kansas nursing home fines over the last five years,” said Rachel Monger, the organization’s vice president of government affairs.

Do you have an experience with a bad or good nursing home in Kansas? Leave a comment below.

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